Radioactive dating moon


Carbon-14 dating works well for samples less than about 50,000 to 60,000 years old and for things that were getting their carbon from the air.The long ages (billions of years) given by radioactive dating of rocks seems an impossibly long time for some people.Most of the radioactive isotopes used for radioactive dating of rock samples have too many neutrons in the nucleus to be stable.Recall that an isotope is a particular form of an element.When plants absorb carbon-dioxide in the photosynthesis process, some of the carbon dioxide has the carbon-14 atom in the molecule.



After yet another half-life, there is 1/2 of that 1/4 left = 1/2 × 1/2 × 1/2 = 1/8 of the original amount of the parent left (which is the fraction asked for).Since radioactive rocks have been observed for only a few decades, how do you know you can trust these long half-lives and the long ages derived?Here are some points to consider: The gamma ray frequencies and intensities produced by radioactive elements in supernova remnants change in the same predictable way as they do here on the Earth.Or you can tell that certain parts of the Moon's surface are older than other parts by counting the number of craters per unit area.